An analysis of the american history as depicted in to kill a mockingbird by harper lee

She attended Huntingdon College in Montgomery —45and then studied law at the University of Alabama — While attending college, she wrote for campus literary magazines:

An analysis of the american history as depicted in to kill a mockingbird by harper lee

As a character, Atticus is even-handed throughout the story. He is one of the very few characters who never has to rethink his position on an issue. He uses all these instances as an opportunity to pass his values on to Scout and Jem.

Scout says that "'Do you really think so? Atticus uses this approach not only with his children, but with all of Maycomb. And yet, for all of his mature treatment of Jem and Scout, he patiently recognizes that they are children and that they will make childish mistakes and assumptions.

Ironically, Atticus' one insecurity seems to be in the child-rearing department, and he often defends his ideas about raising children to those more experienced and more traditional.

His stern but fair attitude toward Jem and Scout reaches into the courtroom as well. He politely proves that Bob Ewell is a liar; he respectfully questions Mayella about her role in Tom's crisis. One of the things that his longtime friend Miss Maudie admires about him is that "'Atticus Finch is the same in his house as he is on the public streets.

And although most of the town readily pins the label "trash" on other people, Atticus reserves that distinction for those people who unfairly exploit others. Atticus believes in justice and the justice system. He doesn't like criminal law, yet he accepts the appointment to Tom Robinson's case.

He knows before he begins that he's going to lose this case, but that doesn't stop him from giving Tom the strongest defense he possibly can.

And, importantly, Atticus doesn't put so much effort into Tom's case because he's an African American, but because he is innocent. Atticus feels that the justice system should be color blind, and he defends Tom as an innocent man, not a man of color.

Atticus is the adult character least infected by prejudice in the novel. He has no problem with his children attending Calpurnia's church, or with a black woman essentially raising his children.

Harper Lee

He admonishes Scout not to use racial slurs, and is careful to always use the terms acceptable for his time and culture. He goes to Helen's home to tell her of Tom's death, which means a white man spending time in the black community. Other men in town would've sent a messenger and left it at that.

His lack of prejudice doesn't apply only to other races, however. He is unaffected by Mrs. Dubose's caustic tongue, Miss Stephanie Crawford's catty gossip, and even Walter Cunningham's thinly veiled threat on his life.

He doesn't retaliate when Bob Ewell spits in his face because he understands that he has wounded Ewell's pride — the only real possession this man has.

An analysis of the american history as depicted in to kill a mockingbird by harper lee

Atticus accepts these people because he is an expert at "climb[ing] into [other people's] skin and walk[ing] around in it.The novel To kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a masterpiece that takes readers to explore how human behave.

The feelings, conflicts, meanings, reasons, love, cruelty, kindness and humor within the book is what makes the book a necessity to the reader.

Search the world's information, including webpages, images, videos and more. Google has many special features to help you find exactly what you're looking for. To Kill a Mockingbird: Discrimination Against Race, Gender, and Class Scout and Jem sit with their father, Atticus.

Harper Lee’s classic novel To Kill a Mockingbird centers on a young girl named Jean Louise “Scout” Finch.

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Her father Atticus Fincher, a lawyer, takes a case to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman. The theme of systemic racism runs through Harper Lee's narrative in her coming-of-age novel To Kill a urbanagricultureinitiative.com's fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, was a product of her own upbringing in.

Jim Crow Laws. The racial concerns that Harper Lee addresses in To Kill a Mockingbird began long before her story starts and continued long urbanagricultureinitiative.com order to sift through the many layers of prejudice that Lee exposes in her novel, the reader needs to understand the complex history .

The Theme of Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird - One of the widely recognized controversies in American history is the s, which housed the Great Depression and the post-civil war, the ruling of Plessy versus Ferguson and the Jim Crow Laws, and segregation.

Mistaken for Racist - TV Tropes